Inspired by Australia’s first saint, we are working to transform lives with dignity for self determination

 

Guided by the Gospel, we stand with the poor and the marginalised so they can realise their potential and participate fully in the community. Through access to education and learning of practical life skills, we seek to transform lives.

“I’m a teacher, let’s start today!” – Saint Mary MacKillop

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Who we are

Through Mary MacKillop Today, the vision of Australia’s first Saint and of the Sisters of Saint Joseph is being realised. In the spirit of Mary MacKillop, we work in partnership to help create generational change through the teaching of practical life skills to women, men and children in Australia and beyond.

What we do

We work with local communities in Australia and internationally through learning for life and enabling access to learning opportunities in the areas of educationhealthfinancial inclusion and livelihoods to share practical life skills for self-sufficiency.

Last year Mary MacKillop Today:

Provided literacy training for 281 teachers in Timor-leste .
Provided literacy training for 281 teachers in Timor-leste .
Provided literacy training for 281 teachers in Timor-leste .
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Featured News

Latest from our blog

  • Helping women affected by family violence in Peru

    September 1, 2020

    One of the greatest dangers of the COVID-19 pandemic has been the increased risk of family violence. Women, especially, are suffering abuse at the hands of family members in their home.

  • What does it mean to achieve financial freedom?

    September 1, 2020

    For many people, the impact of COVID-19 has brought financial hardship. With widespread job losses and business shutdowns, it means less money in the pockets of people who are desperately trying to make ends meet

  • Meet Hayden, First Nations Scholarship recipient

    September 1, 2020

    Growing up, Hayden loved reading and learning all that he could. The more he learnt, the more he began to see the injustices that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were facing. That’s when he decided on his dream of becoming a lawyer.